Creating A Temporary Flower Garden

Creating a Temporary Garden

Have you ever wanted to put in a new flower garden but you really weren’t sure how it would look or exactly how you wanted it? Me too!

 

On a whim I decided to put a new flower garden in our yard. I had a vision forming, sort of. I was hesitant. Digging up grass is hard work. Digging up grass in an area that was growing when much of the rest of the lawn was patchy feels a bit counter-productive.

I tend to get an idea and then jump right in. Well, at least when it comes to diy projects. I was ready. Then the electric company installed a lovely stabilizing cable in nearly the spot I was planning. Grrr. I was imagining, the winter plows and snowblower.  I was thinking of Dig Safe – yikes.

 

What’s a girl to do? Put in a temporary garden of course!

 

One that can be changed if you don’t like where it is or how it turned out. One that can be moved for the winter. One that requires no digging. Yeah, less work. No, electrocution. Two of my favorite characteristics of a diy.

 

Here’s the spot before I started, yuck.

temp garden 2

 

How does this work?

I had already tried using newspaper this year as a weed deterrent. So far, it’s working well. This time I used cardboard. Why? I really don’t know. Sounded good at the time. It was windy. Bigger pieces are better, think refrigerator boxes. We had installed a new shower unit and still had the boxes. This worked great.

I laid out the cardboard in the shape desired. My area ended up being sort of a triangle. Sort of a heart. Really just random. It measures about 9′ x 9′ x 11′.

 

 

temp garden 3

 

Make it what you want.

This is just to get a sense of what I did. It helps to use stones to help hold the cardboard in place while working. I came up with this super smart idea after chasing all the pieces around the yard. Twice.

Temp garden 1

The look of your temporary garden is up to you. What do you like? Traditional? Modern? Farmhouse? Industrial? Rustic? Shabby Chic? Make it yours, make it unique.  I am so random. I like it all. I like it if I like it. No particular style. Oh yeah, I guess that means I’m eclectic. That used to mean weird. To me it means interesting and hip. What it usually means at our house is free.

Neat pieces add interest to the new spot. In our shed I found, – thanks Grandma for never throwing anything away – a wagon wheel, a galvanized watering can, a galvanized washtub, a weird metal chair, a few random lawn ornaments, and a shepherd hook.

First I put in the shepherd hook since I wanted the watering can to hang from it and seem to water the flowers – temp garden 4thank you Pinterest.  The easiest is to use a spot that has a gap between the cardboard pieces. If that doesn’t work, use a razor knife to create the best spot for you.

 

 

I was able to fill the washtub with a hanging arrangement I already had. I simply bent the wire hanger out of site. I propped it up using another pot upside down in the washtub under it.  It appears from a distance that I have planted flowers into the washtub. This saved time and money since I didn’t have to add any soil to the washtub, or buy the plant since Grandma received it for Mother’s Day.  Therefore, I also won’t have to remove any dirt at the end of the season or lug it full to another place for storage.  Free and easy. #winning.

Bark mulch covers the cardboard. You can get a nice clean edge by holding one hand against the cardboard edge while pushing the mulch to meet it.

The wagon wheel was placed into the scene with the help of my son, since I couldn’t hold it upright and see how it looked at the same time. Once we positioned it how I wanted, large stones keep it in place.

The other items I have added and interchanged more than once.

Finally, edging.  All of our flower gardens are edged with river rocks. Use railroad ties, large stones, picket fences or any other edging materials that go with your yard.

Here’s how it stands now:

Temp garden 7

 

The best part is it was all free. Sure, the bark mulch and river rocks were not found stored in the shed. However, they were purchased in bulk as part of our yard budget and were technically leftover. The rocks could be moved and used again somewhere else. Though I am sure if my kids haul one more sled full of rocks, there may be anarchy.

I love that it’s all temporary. Change it with the seasons. Change it with a whim. Change its whole location – well, maybe next year. It’s really that easy. Start to finish, it took me two hours.

Oh, and did I mention it was free?

Try it out.  Let me know how it worked for you.

creating a temporary flower garden

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